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Using Simulations to Protect Children: With The NSPCC’s Laura Randall

3 minute read

 

 

Having a serious conversation with a child can be a challenge at the best of times. Even more so if you’re concerned that they might be experiencing abuse.

The NSPCC’s Let Children Know You’re Listening project shows how many adults do not feel confident approaching such a difficult subject. The charity collaborated with Attensi to create ‘Talk to Me‘: an immersive training simulation designed to give adults the confidence to hold difficult conversations with children about abuse.

Watch our conversation with the NSPCC’s Head of Strategy, Laura Randall, to uncover the lessons and insights from this unique simulation. Short on time? Read on for some of the key topic highlights from the webcast.

 


 

A safe space to practice talking, and listening

 

With any skillset, you gain confidence by practicing. Eventually, what was once a challenging task becomes closer to second nature. But how exactly can you practice having a difficult conversation with a child about abuse?

Here’s where ‘Talk to Me’ offers something genuinely new and innovative. The simulation gives adults a safe space to make mistakes, see the consequences, and try again.

By presenting multiple dialogue options in every scenario, ‘Talk to Me’ guides users towards the best practice responses. And explains why some are better choices than others on offer.

 

 

 

 

 


 

95% of surveyed users felt more confident after using ‘Talk to Me’

 

The ultimate aim of ‘Talk to Me’ is to give adults the tools and confidence to know how to have difficult conversations with children. To that end, the response from users to date has been overwhelmingly positive.

We asked for feedback from users after they completed the scenarios. 95% agreed that they now felt more confident talking to children about abuse.

Amongst the same group, 98% stated that the material was relevant to their work. Furthermore, 98% also said they would recommend the simulation to friends and colleagues.

 

 

 

 

 


 

How else could ‘Talk to Me’ be applied in the future?

 

‘Talk to Me’ currently has two scenarios, both based in a fictional school classroom environment. But what other topics and scenarios might this simulation be used for?

From our survey feedback, 99% of respondents were interested in seeing more content in this simulation. When we asked our users which topics they would like to explore, the most popular included mental health, bullying, and online safety. All of which are currently under consideration as we plan for the future development of this unique training solution.

You can read more about these findings and recommendations in the NSPCC report on ‘Talk to Me’.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Interested in more stories like these? Head over to our news section to keep up with the latest on gamified simulation training.

Topic timeline:

 

02:03 – What is ‘Talk to Me’? And how does it work?

04:24 –What challenges can ‘Talk to Me’ help adults tackle?

08:59 – How is ‘Talk to Me’ different from traditional training methods?

13:28 – How did NSPCC experts input into ‘Talk to Me’?

20:00 – The Results: What feedback has been collected?

24:38 – What other topics could ‘Talk to Me’ address in the future?

Now try ‘Talk to Me’ for yourself

 

You’ve seen the webcast, now it’s your turn. ‘Talk to Me’ guides you through a range of interactive simulated scenarios that help you learn how to build the trust of fictional child characters who you are concerned may be experiencing abuse.

Judge the behaviours of the children to use the right language and approach at the right time. Build their trust to help them talk about their experiences to successfully complete each scenario.

 

TRY NOW

 

✅ Hone your active listening skills in a safe, realistic 3D graphical environment.

✅ Tackle a range of scenarios, created in collaboration with safeguarding experts from the NSPCC.

✅ Feel more confident about having difficult conversations with children who you’re concerned about.

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